No Wonder Europe Banned US Sea Food After BP Gulf Oil Spill; Feds Say Fish Exposed To Oil Safe To Eat In Weeks

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You may not have read about it anywhere else but Europe banned US seafood on July 1st by failing to renew its import agreement because the US failed to comply with regulations to assure that Gulf sea food is safe for human consumption.

July

Posted:7/13/2010

CORRECTION: Regulation allowing U.S. Bivalve Imports into Europe Expires July 1st

Correction to 6/29/2010 posting below–  Beginning July 1, 2010, a European Commission Regulation allowing import of ANY molluscan shellfish and certain marine invertebrates (not only live and fresh product) from the United States expired.  As a result, imports of live, fresh, frozen or processed products containing molluscan shellfish, echinoderms, tunicates, or marine gastropods from the United States are no longer accepted for import into Europe at this time.

June

Posted: 6/29/2010

Regulation allowing U.S. Bivalve Imports into Europe Expires July 1st

Beginning July 1, 2010, a European Commission Regulation allowing import of live and fresh molluscan shellfish and certain marine invertebrates from the U.S. will expire. This is expected to halt the import of these products into the European Union (EU) at that time. Until the products are again allowed to enter, the NOAA Seafood Inspection Program will not issue export health certificates for these products.

The Regulation includes, live and fresh bivalve mollusks, echinoderms, tunicates, and marine gastropods from all U.S. states.  Shellfish from the five states bordering the Gulf of Mexico are already not allowed into the EU for other reasons.  Wild scallop meats, fresh or frozen, will be allowed entry; whole scallops or scallop adductor muscles with the roe attached will not be allowed.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the European Union have been in discussion about the reciprocal equivalence between the nations for live mollusks.  The EU agreed to a six month temporary authorization allowing U.S. exports to continue through July 1, 2010. The differences have not been resolved.

Questions or concerns should be directed to Mr. Paul Distefano at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration at paul.distefano@fda.hhs.gov.

Link to European Commission Decision (2009/951/EU; 14 December 2010)

Specifically the European Union gave the US 6 months in December of 2009 to comply with regulations assuring that sea food harvested from the Gulf of Mexico was safe for human consumption.

Then along came the BP Gulf Oil Spill and needless to say and the US did not comply.

Union controls in the United States to evaluate the control system in place governing the production of bivalve molluscs intended for export to the European Union, the last of which took place in 2009, indicated differences between the American and Union standards for live bivalve molluscs but did not identify serious risks for human health, except for the harvesting area of the Gulf of Mexico. The United States and the European Union have agreed to examine the reciprocal equivalence between US and Union standards for live bivalve molluscs. It is therefore appropriate to authorise, on a temporary basis, the importsinto the European Union of bivalve molluscs, echinoderms, tunicates and marine gastropods from the United States, excluding bivalve molluscs harvested in the Gulf of Mexico. This temporary authorisation should be reviewed six months after its entry into force, taking into account the results of the examination of the equivalence between US and Union standards for live bivalve molluscs.

It’s not surprising that the EU doesn’t accept the US standards for seafood safety.

Just take the latest propaganda from the Government telling the sheeple that fish exposed to oil from the BP Gulf Oil Spill is safe to eat within a few weeks of contamination.

August 4, 2010, NOAA Administrator Dr. Jane Lubchenco Says Fish Contaminated With Oil Safe To Eat Within Weeks.

Transcripts of the federal governments statement that fish exposed to oil from BP Gulf Oil Spill is safe to eat within weeks.

Fish metabolize hydrocarbons relatively rapidly and so if an adult fish, or a fish that would the size that fisherman would catch and bring to market, if that fish is exposed to oil it might be contaminated initially but it metabolizes — it naturally breaks down the oil.

And so after a period of time, on the order of weeks that fish is no longer unfit for human consumption, it has broken down the hydrocarbons, it is safe to eat.

Categories: BP GULF OIL SPILL

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