End of Privacy In America — Feds Using X-Ray Vans To Watch You In Your Home

2

The Christian Science Monitor has ran a disturbing article that reveals the Federal Government is now using X-RAY vans to spy on American citizens anywhere they want, including in their homes and in their cars.

The revelation has drawn much backlash from the community with invasion of privacy and other constitutional rights on one end of the spectrum and the use of radiation on innocent civilians on the other.

‘Feds radiating Americans’? Mobile X-ray vans hit US streets

As an antiterror measure, the US government has deployed mobile X-ray technology to randomly scan cars and trucks. But the measure is riling privacy proponents.

By Patrik Jonsson, Staff writer / September 29, 2010

AtlantaFor many living in a terror-spooked country, it might seem like a great government innovation: Use vans equipped with mobile X-ray units to scan vehicles at major sporting events, or even randomly, for bombs or contraband.

But news that the US is buying custom-made vans packed with something called backscatter X-ray capacity has riled privacy advocates and sparked internet worries about “feds radiating Americans.”

“This really trips up the creep factor because it’s one of those things that you sort of intrinsically think the government shouldn’t be doing,” says Vermont-based privacy expert Frederick Lane, author of “American Privacy.” “But, legally, the issue is the boundary between the government’s legitimate security interest and privacy expectations we enjoy in our cars.”

On Tuesday, a counterterror operation snarled truck traffic on I-20 near Atlanta, where Department of Homeland Security teams used mobile X-ray technology to check the contents of truck trailers. Authorities said the inspections weren’t prompted by any specific threat.

Backscatter X-ray is already part of an ongoing national debate about its use in so-called full body scanners being deployed in many US airports. In that case, US officials have said they will not store or share the images and will use masking technology to avoid revealing details of the human body. Nevertheless, information security advocates have filed suit to stop their deployment, citing concerns about privacy.

But others worry that radiating Americans without their knowledge is evidence of gradually eroding constitutional protections in the post-9/11 age.

“Regardless of where you fall on the spectrum of national security … you have to be realistic that this is another way in which the government is capturing information they may lose control over,” says Mr. Lane. “I just have some real problems with the idea of even beginning a campaign of rolling surveillance of American citizens, which is what this essentially is.”

Read Full Article

What the Cristian Science Monitor article fails to leave out is that that the X-Ray vans can not only be used to see inside of cars, but inside of containers, homes and just about any other object.

X-Ray Van Sees Through Homes

X-RAY Van

Video description:

On the surface this seems like a great tool to catch criminals, until the white collar criminals get a hold of it. Who is to say a lead shield can’t beat it.

Over on What Really Happened one member comments:

I have a few questions:

1- How long do they sit in front of a residence to spy with x-rays?

2- How long does the exposure to x-rays increase the rate of cancer to the recipients?

3- Do they target people of known dissidence or racial groups?

4- Does the community cancer rate increase in areas these vans are used in?

5- Does big Pharmacia have an investment or interest in promoting this type of surveillance?

6- How can a government restrained by constitutional rules pertaining to rights and privacy, justifies this type of invasive espionage upon citizens without due process?

7- Is this a new form of public weapon, a targeted cancer van?

8- Should I paint my house with lead paint, just to have some privacy from a government gone mad?

Categories: POLICE STATE

Write a Comment

Your e-mail address will not be published.
Required fields are marked*